Navman Blog

ROAD TRIPPING AROUND TASMANIA

We’ve partnered with wonderful Australian travel writer Bev Malzard to bring some inspiring travel ideas. Bev is “journalist, editor and self-described general ratbag who has been writing professionally about life and travel since the first planes took off and firmly believes that getting older means getting bolder.” You can follow her blog: www.travelgaltravels.com and Instagram: @bmalzard

 

The tiny island of ‘Tassie’ has an abundance of attractions and experiences to indulge in. Its roads go through some of the most spectacular landscapes and coastlines you’ll see in Australia. After a long period of being unable to travel, here is where you breathe easy, enjoy glorious nature and get a taste of the best of what the island has to offer. Whether you head over on the Spirit of Tasmania or jump in a car at the airport, enjoy the freedom and fresh air of the Apple Isle.

 

Separated from the mainland by 240km of the unpredictable waters of Bass Strait, the island of Tasmania has a brutal history with its beginnings as a far-flung penal colony for hardened villains. And as the island developed, logging, fishing and agriculture began to sustain the island state to become the southern area of Australia and the ‘mother country’s’ fruit basket.

Today, a visit is rich for experiences, from culinary to cool climate wineries, artistic culture to outdoor, natural excursions. Following are six highlights of Tasmania that have been pulled from a hat that is bursting with many more:

 

HOBART

Start with arguably Australia’s most beautiful state’s capital city, Hobart. After colonial times and up to the 1960s Hobart was a sleepy town that had not progressed, and its architecture and back story was ignored by the rest of the country. Now it proudly shows off what was or could have been demolished and forgotten. Places such as Battery Point, built in 1818 to house workers and merchants of the great port. This area is considered to be Australia’s complete colonial village, hardly changed since 1840. Hilly streets, quaint cottages and views to the sea and the imposing backdrop of Mount Wellington looming over Hobart. All that has changed is the traffic and exorbitant real estate prices.

Constitution and Victoria Docks are the heart of Sullivans Cove where pleasure craft and small fishing boats tie up. Fancy some fish and chips? Perfect food for a wander round this precinct, which is all abuzz when the Wooden Boat Festival is held (every two years) and goes crazy as Constitution Dock is the finish line for the annual, prestigious Sydney to Hobart Race held when the yachts depart Sydney to sail south on Boxing Day.

The city offers stunning botanical gardens, waterside walks - and a trip up Mount Wellington is a treat – but damn cold in winter when snow often decorates the summit and the wind cuts through you.

As Tasmania is a gourmet’s passion there are many beautiful and innovative restaurants in the city and within a 30-minute drive out. For locally sourced food for taste heaven check out: Dier Makr; Fico; Franklin and The Agrarian Kitchen Eatery.

Salamanca Markets held along the dockside’s Georgian buildings at the weekend is where you’ll find, fine artisan produce and arts and craft. There are small galleries here in the old warehouses that complement big sister up the road, the Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery.

 

OH, MONA . . .

Embedded into the riverside cliffs along the Derwent and Moorilla Vineyard is an institution that has put Tasmania on the world map . . . MONA, the Museum of Old and New Art. This is one of the most exciting attractions in Australia. Don’t come here looking for an immersion into the gentle art of paintings, come here to be excited, appalled, surprised and moved to tears and laughter.  Drive from the city in 15 minutes or catch the ferry and enter up the stairs from the riverbank. A visit to MONA is about your own experience – be provoked, be entertained.

 

BROODY BRUNY

This rugged island just a short sail from Hobart (best time to go from October to April) is a joy to behold on the journey there. Dolphins at play, gangs of sleepy seals playing possum on the rocks and sea birds swirling above. North and South Bruny are connected by a narrow strip of land called The Neck, which is easier to say than ‘isthmus’.

You can take your car over on the ferry – it runs seven days a week, 365 days of the year. Take a day trip here or enjoy a few lazy days or spectacular bushwalks that come with ‘glamping’ holidays. Camped out in the bush here and being fed on local seafood and fresh Bruny oysters is irresistible.

South Bruny National Park is where the mighty dolerite cliffs around the southern capes stand; Cloudy Bay’s arc of dunes are the result of relentless ocean swells; Great Taylor’s Bay is a calm and sheltered spot where Bennett wallabies, Tasmanian pademelons and echidnas roam – like they own the place!

Don’t miss the path at Cape Bruny that leads you to the convict-built lighthouse – the views from here are spectacular.

 

 

CHOOFING ALONG

Over on the wild west coast you can do the locomotion on an historical train journey. All aboard for the West Coast Wilderness Railway, a restored 1896 rack-and-pinion railway that travels over 34km of river and forest track from Queenstown to Macquarie Harbour or from Strahan to Queenstown. There’s a full day or half day train trip and as you travel through pristine wilderness areas, you’ll cross deep gorges and wonder at the minds that planned this challenging and almost impossible and impassable terrain. All aboard now!

 

 

FASCINATING FREYCINET

Freycinet National Park has the amazing combination of dramatic mountains, elegant beaches, silky smooth lakes – along a narrow peninsular. The peaks of The Hazards light up with a tangerine glow at sunset in the summer and are covered in swirling mist during the cold months. Wonderful walks here and a view, before you descend to Wineglass Bay with its perfect beach of glowing white sand is spectacular.

Canoe along the inshore waters and paddling around Coles Bay offers up a splendid view of The Hazards.

Freycinet Lodge is pretty fancy for a stay and great views of Coles Bay. From water view rooms and restaurants, after a relax, there are organised walks and outdoor activities – if you can tear yourself away from the deck!

Full on posh is the divine Saffire Lodge, a luxurious experience for fine dining, fine spa treatments and a damn fine view of The Hazards when you look out your windows. There’s a trip to Coles Bay to shuck your own oysters while standing in the bay (in waterproof waders) and sipping a glass of bubbly. Nothing could be finer.

If that’s not enough for you, you can also sort through Tasmania’s box of tricks which includes: the city of Launceston on the Tamar River; incredible wineries like Josef Chromy Wines outside Launceston; Cradle Mountain; historic Richmond and Port Arthur and more.