Navman Blog

Getting the most out of your Navman: Safety Features – Part 2

 

At Navman we care hugely about road safety.  It’s why we’ve spent so many years adding new features and fine-tuning how our devices provide guidance through visual, verbal, audio cues.  We’ve studied how people drive in different circumstances, and we know that how they drive in urban areas is different to driving longer drives in rural areas.

Statistics show that rural crashes make up just under half of all fatal road crashes (46%) and fatalities (48%), despite less than a third (31%) of the Australian population living outside major metropolitan centres.* The per capita risk of dying or being hospitalised in a rural compared with an urban crash was 4.2 times and 2.3 times higher respectively**

We know rural conditions are different from driving in the city and so we’ve incorporated a number of features into our GPS and dash cam devices to accommodate all kinds of situations and environments.

You’ll really appreciate spoken and visual guidance when driving at dusk or night time when there is limited visibility and virtually no street lights.  And many of our GPS devices have “Premium Safety Alerts” which are brilliant for driving in rural areas because they give advanced warning when there is a change in the road ahead.  For example if there is a hairpin bend or the road is narrowing; if you’re in a high wind zone or a steep hill approaching, so you can slow down and take extra care. Here are some of the features you might like to use on your next country or long distance drive:

 

Driver Fatigue Alerts

What is it?

Your Navman will let you know when you have been driving continuously for more than 2 hours. It not only sends you a warning, but it will also let you know the nearest place to stop, for instance a petrol station coming up or a rest stop. just hit the short cut button and the Navman will guide you to the next stop

How does it help?

Many of us are guilty of trying to ‘push through’ and drive further than we should without a break, or simply lose track of time on long drives? And the statistics are scary: around 20-30% of all fatal crashes on Australian roads are due to fatigue***.

Navman not only reminds you to take a break, it can guide you to the nearest place where you can get a decent meal or even find overnight accommodation.

Navman models with this feature: All

 

Roadside Assist

What is it?

Roadside Assist pinpoints your location and can store your emergency contacts or roadside assist number, or the nearest mechanic, so it’s easy to get help and let them know where they can find you. If your phone is connected via Bluetooth, you can call through your Navman.

How does it help?

In urban areas, it’s easy to let roadside assistance know where you are by giving the nearest cross street or street number, but not so if you are driving in the middle of a very long highway miles from town or even a petrol station, or worse still, if you are driving your 4WD off the beaten track. By being able to give your exact location, help can find you quicker and easier. Plus, your Navman could also tell you the nearest mechanic to you based on where you have broken down.

Navman models with this feature: All

 

Fuel Type Search

What is it?

You can find the nearest station that has your vehicle’s fuel type simply by using Navman’s Smart Find keyword search and entering in your specific fuel type, similar to how you’d look for an address using the Smart Find keyword search. Your Navman will then list all available options, starting with the ones closest to you.

How does it help?

There’s nothing worse than that panic of running low on fuel, and not knowing where the next petrol station is. It’s worse when you are driving a vehicle that uses LPG gas or diesel, as not all stations will carry the fuel type you need. This feature can help you plan ahead and give you peace of mind on long rural drives.

Navman models with this feature: EZY, MY Series and Drive Duo models

 

Voice Destination Entry

What is it?

Never handle your Navman when you are driving, make sure you pull up on the side of the road or get the help of your passenger. There are times that it might not be possible to stop, or you don’t have a passenger who can help. Voice command allows you to keep your hands on the wheel – and eyes on the road - while telling your Navman to direct you to places such as your home, nearby food, ATM or simply say the address of where you want to go. You can even adjust the volume and screen brightness.

How does it help?

Voice Destination gives you greater ease, and safety, by enabling you to use your Navman without taking your eyes off the road or your hands off the steering wheel.

Navman models with this feature: MY690LMMT and Drive Duo  models

 

Bluetooth Handsfree

What is it?

So many accidents are caused by mobile phone distractions. Have the ability to stay in touch on the go, without getting distracted with a mobile phone, with Navman’s built-in Bluetooth® connectivity, which turns your Navman into a hands-free car kit via a compatible mobile phone.

How does it help?

The temptation to use your mobile phones to check messages and social media can be strong. Powerfully distracting, particularly on long drives where the mind craves stimulation, they are not only best kept away from the driver, it is now also the law. However, there are times when you need to make or take an urgent call, so Navman’s Bluetooth means you can still be in touch for important calls, not be distracted by your mobile phone – and keep your hands and eyes on the road.

Navman models with this feature: EZY, MY Series and Drive Duo models

 

* Australian Bureau of Statistics. (2010). Persons, Place of Usual Residence by Remoteness Area. Accessed 2nd November 2011 from http://www. abs. gov.au/CDATAOnline

** Department of Infrastructure and Transport. (2011). Australian Road Deaths Database – Online. Accessed 2nd November 2011 from http://www. infrastructure. gov.au/roads/safety/road_fatality_ statistics/fatal_road_ crash_database.aspx

 

 

***Australian Transport Council 2011, National Road Safety Strategy 2011-2020, p. 25, viewed 25 July 2013, 
http://www.infrastructure.gov.au/roads/safety/national_road_safety_strategy/files/NRSS_2011_2020_15Aug11.pdf